The Crimson Cord by Jill E. Smith

Reviewed by Martha Artyomenko

Rahab-Cover-293x453

Book description (From author’s website): 

Wife to a gambler who took one too many risks, Rahab finds herself sold as a slave to cover her husband’s debt. Forced into prostitution by Dabir, counselor to the Syrian king, Rahab despairs of ever regaining her freedom and her self-respect. But when Israelite spies enter Jericho and come to lodge at her house, Rahab sees a glimmer of hope and the opportunity of a lifetime.

In one risky moment, she takes a leap of faith, puts her trust in a God she does not know, and vows to protect the spies from the authorities. When the armies of Israel arrive weeks later, Rahab hopes they will keep their promise, but she has no idea what kind of challenges await her outside Jericho’s walls–or if she will ever know the meaning of love.

My Review:

Portrayed as a wife of a gambler, whom took too many risks, I believe women from now will relate to this story of Rahab. We do not have the same laws that allow us to buy and sell one another as they did in those times. However, I see women in similar situations that feel as if they were bought or sold into a lifestyle.

Biblical fiction can be tough to write well. Jill Smith hits the mark in this story of Rahab. I felt as if I was living and walking alongside her. I could understand her desperation and lack of choice regarding her lifestyle. You will have deeper insight into the history that goes along with the bible story. This book is one that will make you want to re-read her story in the bible and exclaim over it.

I believe it is one of the best stories or retellings that I have ever read about Rahab, Joshua, “the spies” and Jericho.

This book does speak of abuse at the hands of the people that imprisoned her, wicked acts that the people of Jericho participated in, as well as what happened to Achan in detail. It would not be a book for younger teens, but could be a good biblical discussion book for older teens.

This book was provided for me for review by NetGalley. The opinions contained herein are my own.

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Filed under Book Reviews, Historical Romance

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