Twenty Two by Alison Trowbridge

Reviewed by Martha Artyomenko

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Book Description

Allison Trowbridge harnesses the power of story in a series of letters to an imagined young woman wrestling with the questions that arise as she stands on the precipice of adulthood.

The 21st century is a wonderful and complicated time to be a young woman. From access to higher education and advances in gender equality to the innovations of social networks and limitless travel destinations, no twenty-two-year-old woman has ever had more options before her than the college graduate of today. And yet, even with the world at her feet, she often has more questions than answers, more pressures than prospects, and more disenchantment than direction.

Stepping into this glaring disconnect, Allison Trowbridge offers Twenty-Two, a series of personal letters that marries true life experiences and advice with the fictional life of the recipient, Ashley, a young woman looking for mentorship from someone one step ahead in life. Trowbridge subtly weaves in today’s most pressing social issues—from poverty in our neighborhoods to human trafficking across the globe—inspiring a greater sense of mission in both Ash and the reader.

Twenty-Two is a book that speaks to millennial women, a generation hungry for a bigger life story yet uncertain about how to get there. But it is not a how-to book for girls coming of age, because a field guide could never capture the complexities of this season. Rather, Twenty-Two is a deeply personal narrative about friendship, heartbreak, and hope that will inspire young women from a wide variety of backgrounds to live fully into their own remarkable journeys today.

My Review:

This is a unique book of letters from a mentor to another, full of life issues that might face a young woman of today’s society. I think that it would speak to many young women of today, but I found myself lost amid the pages a few times and realized my age.

It would be a lovely gift for a graduating senior, heading out to college to read, if they take the time to read. The short letter like chapters, leave this book easy to follow and read for those that relate to the issues addressed.

This book was given to me for review by BookLook Bloggers. The opinions contained herein are my own.

I review for BookLook Bloggers

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